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Three Tips for Helping Employees Feel Valued

I was in the office of a manger of a fairly large company not too long ago. In this office the manager proudly
Certificate
displayed the certificates of achievement his department’s employees had earned. He was a senior leader and very proud of the things employees had accomplished even two or three levels down the hierarchy.
I was impressed that he cared enough to proudly display them.

What kind of statement do you think this made to the employees? Well, the proof of that was in what his department had done. He was certainly the leader I believed he was. He learned how to make people feel valued.

People want to feel valued. Most of the research on satisfaction at work shows that feeling valued is more important than things like money, an office and even promotions. Here are three things you can do now to start helping employees feel valued:

1.    Sticky note appreciation. Write a quick sticky note of specific appreciation and place it on an employees computer monitor when they go home. It is a nice surprise in the morning.

2.    Transfer marbles. I once heard of a CEO that would place five marbles in his right pocket at the beginning of each day. Each time he complimented someone, he would transfer a marble to his left pocket. The goal was that at the end of the day he would have transferred all the marbles. Eventually he didn’t need the marbles, it became a life long habit.

3.    Send foosball tables. I kid you not, I once had a boss that sent me a foosball table. He knew I enjoyed playing and this was a token of his appreciation for me. However, it wasn't the cost of the gift that helped me feel appreciated and valued, it was the thought that he would go through the trouble to send something like that to me.

What have you done or seen done that helped employees feel valued?

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Mike Rogers

  • http://create-learning.com/blog michael cardus

    i agree appreciation for employees is valuable. although i would exercise caution in the ‘more important than promotions’.
    all the praise around you while you still feel that you are not respected for the work you do is not going to motivate you.
    People require praise in various levels. To some folks a quiet thank you on their monitor is enough. I know of others who after years of great work and many, many, ‘thanks yous’ eventually after not getting a raise or promotion finally had enough.
    Praise is appreciated when sincere and meaningful.
    Plus I am confused at to why the leader had his employees certificates of achievement in his office? why not in their offices or in a public area. It sounds to me like this leader needed his ego inflated by the amount of awards he allowed his people to achieve.

  • http://create-learning.com/blog michael cardus

    i agree appreciation for employees is valuable. although i would exercise caution in the ‘more important than promotions’.
    all the praise around you while you still feel that you are not respected for the work you do is not going to motivate you.
    People require praise in various levels. To some folks a quiet thank you on their monitor is enough. I know of others who after years of great work and many, many, ‘thanks yous’ eventually after not getting a raise or promotion finally had enough.
    Praise is appreciated when sincere and meaningful.
    Plus I am confused at to why the leader had his employees certificates of achievement in his office? why not in their offices or in a public area. It sounds to me like this leader needed his ego inflated by the amount of awards he allowed his people to achieve.

  • http://katenasser.com Kate Nasser, The People-Skills Coach

    Hi Mike,
    I love the truthful simplicity of this post and will tweet it on Twitter. What makes this type of recognition so valued is that it’s personal.
    Something else peers can do to show respect for each other is honor personality type. Wonderful bonding and trust building as a result. Here’s more …
    http://katenasser.com/kate-nasser-gps-for-personality-types/
    Best wishes,
    Kate Nasser, The People-Skills Coach

  • http://www.cmoe.com/teamwork.htm teamwork workshops

    Teamwork entails cooperation from employees…and if employees are cooperative, the organization is successful. As stated in this blog entry, it is important to give value to employees. Only then will they be able to really appreciate their contribution to the success of an organization. Happy and well-valued employees are priceless.

  • http://www.teamworkandleadership.com Mike Rogers

    Thanks for your comments everyone. There are many different ways to help employees feel valued.
    Michael, I would agree for some people, promotions are more important than say praise, but in most cases there things more important than promotions and money to people. I am not saying these aren’t important, their just not as important as some of the more simple things.
    Kate, you are right. A team who understands the various personality types of team members is more likely to understand each other better, which always leads to more trust.

  • http://violatam.com Viola Tam

    Hi, Mike,
    I agree with you that people love recognitions. What you have shared are some of the gestures that can make the employee feel valued.
    You are right! The value of the gift is secondary. The important thing is the recognition itself.
    A great leader has developed the HABIT of recognising even the tiniest strengthens of his or her employees. Awards are important, so are recognising the efforts!
    Viola Tam

  • http://www.openthemeeting.com Mike Rogers

    Habit is the right word Viola. Leaders need to get in the habit of recognizing everything and anything they can.

  • Pingback: What are the top 10 Ways to Help Employees Feel Valued?

  • Liza Gordon

    People who do these apparently ‘small’ things tend not to recognise how much that impacts on employees- but for employees who have never experienced feeling valued, it means so much! A common technique I use is to send a thank you email when an employee has dealt with a difficult client, or helped out on an urgent deadline, briefly outlining what they did and why I appreciated it. Then I usually cc that to that appropriate people often including those higher on the ‘food chain’. The response from employees is often astonishment, and delight. I tell them to print it out and put it in their ‘good things’ folder, which they can use when applying for jobs or putting together a CV. Loyalty is never a problem for me- I do my best for my team and it comes back to me magnified. I’m enjoying your blogs Michael!

Want to Know More About The Author of This Post?

I have led, trained and consulted in business with hundreds of individuals and teams on leadership and team concepts. My greatest satisfaction in life is seeing others succeed. I am currently the owner of "Teamwork and Leadership Bloggings with Michael Rogers" and OpenTheMeeting.com.

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